no-boil mead recipes

No-boil Mead Recipes of Yesteryear

No-boil mead recipes of yesteryear

Often we are so busy making beerwine, mead, and other manner of fermentations that we don’t have enough time to blog about all of them. Such was the case in June of 2012.

Our first no-boil mead recipes were lovingly crafted, though neglected to be blogged. A semi-sweet clover honey mead is now more than 2 whole years old and it is mighty delicious.

no-boil mead recipes
A clover mead on the left an organic tropical blossom mead on the right. Both of these are no-boil mead recipes.

Similar cases abound. A dry mead of tropical origin from the same time frame was also excluded from the blog treatment.

This post is meant to remedy our ill-treatment of these no-boil mead recipes.

The no-boil clover mead recipe

This was the first and one of the only show meads we have made. It was also the first time of many that we would simply use water out of the tap. We combined it with clover honey, bee pollen, and Lalvin K1-V1116 yeast.

We use water out of the tap for all of our no-boil mead recipes. Nothing special, we’re not water chemistry buffs. Most of the time we’re using a community water supply that doesn’t have things like fluoride or chloramine added. That being said, some members of the brew crew have brewed no-boil mead recipes with City of Portland, Oregon tap water without issue.

no-boil mead recipes
This clover mead is about two years old and crystal clear.

Clover Show Mead

4 gallons water
17.5 lbs Clover honey
1 tablespoon bee pollen
Lalvin K1-V1116

Clean and sanitize a 5.5+ gallon fermenter. Prepare a yeast starter with a little bit of honey, bee pollen, water, and the yeast. Add a gallon of warm (room temperature to as hot as the tap will get) water to the fermenter. Add the honey to the fermenter. Shake carefully but well. Keep adding water and shaking until you reach the desired volume and the honey and water and integrated. Measure the brix or gravity. Add the yeast starter.

OG 1.116, 14.1% ABV5 gallons of show mead

We brewed this way back on June 17, 2012! If you like yourself a sweet mead, give this a try. More honey equals more alcohol in this case. The K1-V1116 yeast is tolerable up to 18% ABV!

How’s that for one of our delicious and simple no-boil mead recipes?

No-boil tropical blossom mead recipe

This recipe was intentionally scaled back compared to the no-boil clover mead recipe. With only 12.5 pounds of honey it doesn’t have quite as much alcohol potential as other no-boil mead recipes. That’s okay though. That means it will be both drier and less alcoholic. It’s simply a different taste than the show mead which can be cloyingly sweet to some.

Tropical Blossom Mead

4 gallons gallons water
12.5 lbs Organic Tropical Blossom honey
2 tablespoons bee pollen
1 packet Lalvin K1-V1116 yeast

Clean and sanitize a 5.5+ gallon fermenter. Prepare a yeast starter with a little bit of honey, bee pollen, water, and the yeast. Add a gallon of warm (room temperature to as hot as the tap will get) water to the fermenter. Add the honey to the fermenter. Shake carefully but well. Keep adding water and shaking until you reach the desired volume and the honey and water and integrated. Measure the brix or gravity. Add the yeast starter.

12.3% ABV5 gallons of dry mead

This really is one of my favorite no-boil mead recipes. We brewed this on September 14, 2012. It’s still as dry as when it first finished fermenting. While it’s just as dry as after fermentation, the harshness of the alcohol in both taste and smell has lessened significantly with aging. Much more of the floral taste and aroma is able to come through.

Final thoughts

Remembering to prepare a yeast starter with a little bit of each of the ingredients of your no-boil mead recipes will ensure that a healthy fermentation starts right away. This is critical. It’s best to get a healthy yeast colony established before any unwanted critters can get their hold.

In a part two post of sorts that is coming soon I’ll show you the final fate of these two meads. I’ll give you a hint: it involves fruit!

 

Notes:
Creative Commons License
All photos in this post are works of Jasmine Silver and are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

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